Well, it was only a matter of time before I ended up working with Siebel again!

I’ve been introduced recently to Amazon Web Services – AWS to you and me. So this is what Cloud Computing is all about! I’m utterly gob-smacked by the power of this platform, the stuff you can do and the speed at which you can do it.

I was tasked with building a Siebel 16 installation using AWS and it is amazingly straight forward. Not to mention incredibly cost effective, compared to using physical hardware and on-premise virtualisation.

I thought I’d share with you the process of spinning Siebel up “in the Cloud”!

First up, my architecture involves two AWS instances – an RDS instance for the database and an EC2 instance for the Application and Web Servers. Using RDS, I’m able to spin up an Oracle Enterprise Edition 12c database in less than 10 minutes. It’s literally a few clicks and you’re done – no more slaving away with OUI, downloading files and the installation and configuration process. AWS captures parameters from simple web pages and does the rest – lightening fast. AWS will even keep my Oracle installation up to date, automatically applying minor patch updates during a maintenance windows that I can define.

SiebelDBAWS

So, I have a database instance up and running. I then spin up a new Windows 2012 R2 server. Again, the process is ludicrously quick. I choose from a number of types that have varying RAM, CPU and bandwidth allocations, allocate C and D drives with 60 and 120GB respectively and click a button. Less than 10 minutes later, I have an RDP file to download to my laptop that allows me to connect to the new server. I then jump on to Oracle eDelivery and download the Siebel installation media – I’m getting speeds of nearly 70MBs (that’s mega BYTES, not BITS!) and download the full Siebel installation in under 15 minutes. I unzip the media and backup the installation files to Amazon’s storage offering, S3.

SiebelE2App

I download and install a Java SDK, Oracle 12c 32-bit Client and SQL Developer then set up my TNSNAMES. I then run SNIC to extract everything and prepare my Siebel installation media and kick off my Siebel installation. Within another couple of hours I have a fully functioning Siebel environment.

While this is all pretty much “installing Siebel on a remote server”, the real benefit comes of now saving my Siebel Server installed as an Amazon Machine Image (AMI). This will allow me to VERY quickly spin up new Siebel 16 server environments for whatever I need – training, dev environments, the list is endless.

I’ve always been a bit of a cynic when it comes to “Cloud” computing but AWS has got me converted. This stuff is HUGE and it is AWESOME – with this stuff, server rooms are sure to become a thing of the past.